ASP.NET Core default project content

ASP.NET Core default project content

Post about creating ASP.NET Core project very briefly described how to setup project without much thinking, this time it’ll be a little more in depth. I’ll describe what initial project contains, what are differences between ASP.Core and ASP.NET MVC, what is new. Setup is same as before – empty ASP.NET Core project for .NET Core 1.1 with Web Application template, Individual Accounts authentication and without Docker support. So this is how empty looks like, If you had previous experience with ASP.NET…

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JIRA integration with C# and REST API

JIRA integration with C# and REST API

JIRA is one of the most popular tools for IT teams to manage work and it’ll be next integration for TeamScreen. Documentation is straightforward, so It was easy for me to do it. Same as with TeamCity integration I’ll leverage the power of REST API and RestEase library. For authentication, you have two options – basic HTTP authentication and oath. Recommended is OAuth, but for now, I’ll use basic HTTP authentication, because at the moment the priority is just to connect and display issues from JIRA. JIRA…

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Configuration in .NET Core

Configuration in .NET Core

Setting up From the beginning of .NET we used web.config or app.config files for application configuration. When you’re create new ASP.NET Core project you’ll no longer find those files, instead you’ll have appsettings.json file and in Startup class constructor you’ll find setup of it: This configuration tells us to search for settings file in main application directory (env.ContentRootPath), use appsettings.json file, that must exist (optional: false) and reload whole application, when it’s changed (reloadOnChange: true – available in .NET Core…

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TeamCity integration with C# and REST API

TeamCity integration with C# and REST API

As I mentioned in my previous Get Noticed post. TeamScreen first integration will be with TeamCity. For those who don’t know TeamCity is a continuous integration tool created by awesome guys from JetBrains company that brought you Resharper, IntelliJ, WebSharper and many other great tools. What I want from TeamCity is a list of builds and statuses for them. A quick search in google gave me this page, which describes how to connect to TeamCity and get an info I need using REST…

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About finishing IT projects and perfectionism

About finishing IT projects and perfectionism

In past I started most of my IT-related projects from vision – how should finished product look like, how should it be named, what features should it have? I spent a lot of time imagining it and all the money I’ll earn from it :). Vision and planning itself isn’t good or bad, it has pros and cons, it’s just good to know them. For example, it’s generally good to know, where and why you’re going, problem is when most of…

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Creating ASP.NET Core project in Visual Studio 2017

Creating ASP.NET Core project in Visual Studio 2017

Last time I described project and technologies I plan to use for TeamScreen – especially ASP.NET Core. Today I’ll start with some code – initial project creation. I’ll be using Visual Studio 2017 Release Candidate, so keep in mind some screens may differ with normal version. First new thing that you’ll encounter even before you’ll start using new VS is the new installer: In my opinion much better than in previous versions, because it allows us to be more flexible. Personally for…

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Get Noticed 2017 – Introduction to TeamScreen

Get Noticed 2017 – Introduction to TeamScreen

You know this saying – third times the charm? I really hope it’ll be the case this time, because it’s the third time Maciej Aniserowisz is organizing Daj się Poznać/Get Noticed contest. It’s 2017 and I’m out of excuses. Let me talk about my… Project – TeamScreen Dev teams (but not only them) often have on their part of open space tv screen that shows list and statuses of builds from Jenkins, TeamCity or similar build systems. Sometimes you can…

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Developing git stats application using F# and WPF

Developing git stats application using F# and WPF

Some time ago mostly by curiosity I wanted to check out git statistics of our work repo. Quick search in google didn’t show anything quick and easy, so I thought about developing such an app by myself and learn a bit of F# for bonus. In solution I have two projects – GitStats and Gitstats.Domain. GitStats is a WPF application and WPF + F# = mostly experimental stuff in my opinion, so I decided to go with proven solution and…

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Using canopy and F# for functional testing

Using canopy and F# for functional testing

There are a lot of ways to test the software. The most popular are for sure unit tests, but they check only separate part of the solution. Functional tests on the other hand, allows us to check whole application in testing environment – interaction to db, backend code, frontend code, browser compatibility. This is the thing that we do every time manually after adding new feature – we open browser and we do manual steps to check if everything is ok….

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6 things you should know before starting learning F#

6 things you should know before starting learning F#

When you’re starting learning F# after C# (or other object-oriented language) some language constructs and ideas may seem… weird or counter intuitive. In wanted to briefly mention these things, so you could save some time with compiler trying to understand what you’re doing wrong. 1. Syntax When you compare C#, Java, Javascript most of things look similar – we got braces, pretty much same types, classes. F# on the other hand was created a little bit different – first of all there…

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